Posts tagged ‘Wreath’

June 7, 2012

Making a Daisy Chain

imageNothing says nature wild crafting like a daisy chain! I haven’t made one since I was a kid. I had to pull a bunch of daisies because they were crowding out a rose-bush that was about to bloom.

DIY Daisy Chain:

Pick some daisies and strip the leaves.

Hold the flower head and run your fingertips down the stem to easily and quickly remove them leaving only the flower on the stem.

To start making the chain make a little slit with your thumbnail, about half an inch long in the middle of the stem.

Thread another daisy stem through the hole where you want the flowers, crowded or spaced out. I started braiding the stems for stability in between threading the stems.

To end the daisy chain, pull the petals from one daisy (like the game he-loves-me, he-loves-me-not ;) and use the yellow centre like a button. Use the yellow center to finish it, weave, and cut the loose ends.

I floated mine in a bowl of water to keep it fresh because a cloud burst of rain came before I could take a picture.  It also got rid of bugs, and I let it drip dry before I took a picture.

This is my daisy chain crown:) Make the chain long or short, into bracelets, necklaces or whatever your heart desires. 

This wildflower is also good medicinal food. Eat the leaves as a raw salad green, it tastes good. I prefer the young leaves before they flower. Fresh Daisy herb also makes a good tea, tincture, and essence. 

Common Name Daisy
Latin Name  Leucanthemum vulgare
Family Asteraceae (Aster family)
Parts Used Perennial herb
Target Organs Immune, Nervous, Kidney, Skin
Common Uses Skin: wounds, cuts, bruises, strains, inflammation Nervous system: relaxes nerves, tonic,

Immune: stimulant, tonic

Kidney: diuretic

Properties Anticatarrhal, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, anxiolytic, diaphoretic, diuretic, stimulating emmenagogue, immune stimulant, lymphatic, nervine, relaxant, tranquilizer, vasodilator, vulnerary, mild demulcent,
Constituents Essential oil, phenols, alkaloids, methylsterols
Cautions Caution emetic in large doses. Excessive amounts may cause nausea, vomiting. Do not use during pregnancy: stimulating emmenagogue

 

December 9, 2011

DIY Aromatherapy Pinecone Ornaments

Pinecone Ornaments

My mom asked me to make her some pinecone ornaments for her tree this year. I’m using the ones leftover from making pinecone wreaths. See my blog DIY  Aromatherapy Pinecone Wreaths

for added instructions. I’ve never made any before so I had to start thinking of ideas.

Pinecone Wooden Beaded Ornament

I decided to use beaded necklaces and bracelets that were broken or I didn’t wear anymore.  I took a wooden beaded necklace that I never wore and broke it to use the wooden beads. If the beads have large holes you can use any kind of string but the smaller the hole is I would recommend using beading wire or fishing line instead.

Pinecone Wooden Beaded Ornament

I made four hanging loops with the large wooden beads to suspend the pinecones from the tree. I used a broken small brown beaded necklace to make hanging loops for the other two pinecones to make half a dozen. It was a fast project!

Pinecone Wooden Beaded Ornament

I drilled a small hole in the middle of the bottom of the pinecone to fit the end bead halfway, and then glued the bead to the hole with a hot glue gun but you can use any fast drying glue. You can add ribbon and/or greenery… the options are limitless.

You can add your own favourite essential oils, a couple of drops to each pinecone to make them into Aromatherapy Pinecone Ornaments. I am using tree oils like Balsam fir, Black or white spruce to blend with the tree or Cinnamon and Orange because I love cinnamon cones!

Pinecone beaded ornament

I also used these wonderful ‘candy’ glass beads my friend gave me. I used black beads that were already strung and ran the beaded wire through them and put the colourful candy beads on. I put snowflake obsidian chips on either side to hold it so the big candy bead wouldn’t float through the small beads.

Pinecone ornaments with clear glass beads

I wanted a snowy effect for some pinecones without using glitter, because I have pets and inhaling glitter probably isn’t that healthy. I decided to try clear glass beads instead. I tried wrapping a string of clear glass beads that I had bought already on a string, around the pinecones spiralling centre. I put kid’s white glue on the end of the pinecone tips and dipped and rolled it in clear glass beads on a paper plate. Let them dry on the paper plate for at least 24 hours before touching them.

I am going to hang these from the tip at the top of the pinecone with string or ribbon, which is the easiest way to hang them.

I am going to dip these pinecones quickly in natural melted beeswax that I get from local beekeepers and buy at the maple syrup festival. The beeswax will make sure that the clear white beads stay on the pinecone and it will give the pinecones a shine and protection. I will dip all of the pinecones when I make beeswax candles soon. (I smell another blog!)

You can leave the pinecones au natural and put a couple drops of essential oils on each one or dip the pinecones in melted beeswax with added essential oils.

Either way if you add essential oils make sure you do not put them around open flames or candles because dry pinecones with an added accelerant can start a fire.

Thanks for stopping by.

Happy pinecone crafting!

November 29, 2011

DIY Boxwood Aromatherapy Wreath

Boxwood is a popular green garden hedge and topiary plant.

Boxwood from my garden cut into a globe shape

Using Boxwood for wreath making is a popular choice because they keep their colour and shape relatively well when dried. They may dry a slighty darker green colour and shrink a little so you need  a bunch of sprigs to make a full wreath, or you may want to use it as edging, like I did in some of the wreaths that I have made.

Chili cone wreath with Boxwood

I decided to clip some of my Boxwood plants from my garden to make a wreath for my front door. I clipped them into globes because they are small. You can buy your own boxwood to make your own topiary plant to put in a plant container pot or plant it directly in the garden, and then you can use the clippings for wreath making and botanical arrangements. My Boxwood plants are pretty bald now so I have to let them grow back for a while before I make any more wreaths.

Boxwood close-up

For making the boxwood wreath I used a straw form as a base, that I bought for a dollar.

strawbase wreath form

I wrapped red satin ribbon around it so that some of the straw form alternated with the ribbon. I used a hot glue gun on the boxwood stem ends and wedged them into the cracks of the straw form and underneath parts of the ribbon. A toothpick or skewer can help you place things so that you can avoid getting burned with hot glue.

Be careful when using a hot glue gun! Have a bowl of cold water ready to dip your hand in if you come into contact  with the hot glue. Use lavender essential oil directly on any burns that occur along with aloe vera gel for effective treatment.

Boxwood wreath almost finished

I secured some of the boxwood sprigs with floral pins. I put the wreath on a round ‘Lazy Susan’ flat on the table so that I could easily spin it around while I worked on it. Hang the wreath on the wall to finish it, it gives you a better angle on where to fill in the holes. I tied a big red satin ribbon around the bottom of the straw form half way through making it, so that it wrapped around some boxwood sprigs which helps to hold them into place and then some still filled out around it. I tied the double bow when I finished making the wreath. The double bow is easy if you do rabbit ears for the second loops. At first I added red jingle bells with twisted paper clips, but I found that the floral pins worked better and I fastened them through the straw. It took me about an hour to make.

Boxwood Wreath

I hung it on the front door and the last step was to add essential oil to make it into an Aromatherapy wreath. I added Balsam fir essential oil to the straw sides to give it a fresh evergreen forest smell that greets visitors when they enter. Balsam fir is a popular choice for Christmas trees and for me the smell is synonymous with the holidays, but I don’t cut down trees so this works out even better because it is really all about the aroma! You can add your own choice of essential oils like citrus oils such as orange or other tree oils like Spruce. Use your favourites.

Battery Tealight in Boxwood Wreath

 I taped a battery-powered  tea light candle to peak out in between the ribbon near the bottom just like an old-fashioned traditional wreath but without the fire hazard of burning a candle.

Boxwood wreath with jingle bells

Here is the finished version. It still smells wonderful and it has dried well. I added another bow and some large jingle bells to accompany the red jingle bells in the wreath.

Cheers! Wishing everyone a safe and Happy Holiday!

November 18, 2011

DIY Dried Botancial Aromatherapy Wreath

Dried Aromatherapy Wreath

Our Aunt sent us the most beautiful bouquet of roses just before she died of cancer. I dried the roses and decided to make a wreath out of them. I am going to give the Aromatherapy wreath to her surviving twin sister, who is still having a hard time dealing with the loss of her identical twin. I know she likes lavender too so I put some dried lavender flower heads from my garden and added some boxwood leaves as greenery. I added essential oil of lavender to the dried flowers to make it smell even more wonderful.

I used a round 12’ straw wreath form.

Straw Wreath form 12'

I used a wire ribbon to form the double bow for the front, and a solid green ribbon to wrap around the wreath.

Bow

I added the dried roses first with a low temp. glue gun. Have a bowl of water ready if you burn yourself with hot glue, especially if you use a high temp. glue gun. The low temp glue guns make the glue stringier, but you don’t burn yourself as bad. Have lavender essential oil on hand in case of burns.

 I added clove essential oil to the middle of some flower heads for antifungal, antibacterial action and to make it smell great while I worked on it.  I love the smell of clove and roses together. Add your own favourite essential oils.

I added boxwood leaves around the sides of the roses to fill in and cover the straw form. Boxwood is a good choice because it dries well. The leaves will shrink when dried so it is better to use the straw form than wire, because the wire one may fall apart.

I filled in any imperfections or holes with lavender flower heads and added French Lavender essential oil to make it a true Aromatherapy wreath.

To hang it I used green wire and twisted it around itself to form a hole, and attached the wire to the top of the back of the form.

wire hanger

I hope this gives you some inspirational ideas to work with to make your own Dried Botanical Aromatherapy Wreath.

 

 

 

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