Posts tagged ‘Taraxacum’

April 19, 2013

Greater Celandine Herb

herba 006Greater Celandine is a very hardy perennial that likes moist woodlands and transition areas. It is a native to subarctic Eurasia and became established throughout Eastern North America.

I grew Celandine from seed and transplanted in the garden not knowing what an aggressive invasive it was, but it is pretty and definitely shade tolerant.

I have lots of celandine medicine now after “weeding” a little. The stems ooze a yellow latex that stains. The latex is used to get rid of warts, and any skin condtions, injuries or infections.  Harvest the top 50% just before or when it flowers in May or June, or use the leaves anytime. It is a potentizing herb that is best used in an herbal formulation mixed with demulcents and soothing herbs to counter any skin, mucus membrane irritations. Caution is strongly advised.

Common Name  Celandine (Greater) herb/ flowers/ root
Latin Name  Chelidonium majus
Family Papaveraceae (Poppy)
Parts Used Perennial – herb/ flower- May- June root-fall
Target Organs Digestion, liver/gallbladder, spleen,
Common Uses Liver/ gallbladder: infections, gallstones, spasms, jaundice, hepatitis,  Digestive conditions : IBS, constipation, digestive disturbances,Spleen conditions: dysfunction digestion

 Skin/Immune: infections, skin conditions, spasms, warts, rhematic conditions, cancer (especially skin, stomach, colon, liver)

Secondary use for soft tissue injuries and coughs

Properties antineoplastic, anodyne, analgesic, antibacterial, antifungal, antihepatotoxic, hepatic, bronchodilator, stimulating cardiac, diaphoretic, hypotensive, immune stimulant, narcotic, pancreatic, sedative, spleenic, uterine stimulant, vulnerary,  diuretic, antispasmodic, purgative, anti-inflammatory, depurative, appetite stimulant, laxative, cholagogue, purgative, 
Constituents Isoquinoline alkaloids: chelidonine, sanuinarine, berberine,  allocryptopine, sparteine, stylopine, chelamine, magnoflorine, crytopine, chelerythine, protopine, coptisine; organic acids: chelidonic, malic, citric acid, flavonoids, essential oil, saponins, proteolytic acid, carotenoids, latex,
Cautions Do not use in pregnancy, lactation or for infants. Fresh herb may cause irritations to mucus membranes. Large doses may cause vomiting and diarrhea. Berberine can cause depressed heart function and chronic low pressure with long term use. Dried herb has less caution, but fresh is best used in a formulation up to 25% with combined demulcents. Do not exceed 2-3 month use.
Dosage Formulation Tincture: 2-4ml              Dried  Tea: 2 tsp 10 min
September 13, 2012

DIY Chicory and Dandelion Coffee

A beverage drink that is delicious and good for the liver? I had to taste it to believe it myself and I’m converted! You may never look at your ‘weeds’ the same way again.

Here’s some nutritional information and medicinal uses of the humble dandelion. http://earthelixir.ca/2012/04/24/dandelion/

Chicory flower

I’m sipping on some fresh home-brewed Chicory & Dandelion root coffee as I share this delicious news, it is a good combination together. Both chicory and dandelion are good on their own in a hot beverage, or have them together like I am enjoying.

How to make your own Chicory & Dandelion root Coffee  

Dig up some dandelion and/or chicory roots.

Wash them in a bucket of water outside.

Scrub and rinse them well removing dirt.

Cut them up and rinse them more until clean.

Grind the roots fresh (it is easier at this stage to grind the roots if you don’t have a good grinder)

or grind the roots after they have dry roasted.

Spread them out evenly on a baking sheet.

Roast the roots in a 200 °oven with the door open to dry roast

About an hour or two until golden.

Spread them around while baking and check to see that they don’t burn or get overcooked. Cool and store in a glass sealed jar.

To make coffee : Put 1 tablespoon of roasted root per cup of water and simmer gently in a pot for 5-15 minutes depending on desired strength.

The best tasting brew is when I am camping. Gather the roots, wash them and roast them on a hot rock carefully separated from the fire. Pound the roots. Brew like you would coffee. Tastes the best outdoors!

1 tablespoon of roasted roots to 1 cup of coffee

Drink it how you would like your coffee.

Enjoy! mmmmm *sip

 

April 24, 2012

Dandelion

Dandelion is an amazing nutritious wild edible! Some see dandelion as a noxious weed and try to poison it, but it is amazing medicinal food that has gentle but deep action that detoxifies and nourishes. Dandelion is one of the best supporting herbs for the liver and kidneys, which are important organs for detoxification.

Dandelion is medicinally used in Western Herbalism, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Ayurvedic medicine. The West mainly uses it as a digestive bitter stimulant, diuretic, detoxicant and to restore the liver. It is prized in the Orient for its anti-inflammatory properties that treat acute and chronic infections. In Ayurvedic pharmacology the focus is on the bitter salty taste that drains and detoxifies.

Hardy Dandelion

Dandelion is a liver, kidney tonic that is well suited to treat toxicity related conditions including liver toxicity, chronic skin, joint and rheumatic conditions. It has demonstrated anti-tumour action in vitro and has proven anti-inflammatory, hypoglycemic, diuretic and cholagogue/choleretic properties.

Dandelion is a diuretic that helps to drain fluid and pulls toxins out through the urine. Its bitter taste stimulates digestive secretions such as bile and enzymes and it enhances the quality and quantity of bile helping to digest and break down fats. Its sweet taste due to inulin content restores liver and pancreatic function. The root has a high mineral content that gives it its salty taste that regulates and detoxifies fluids.

It is a well-rounded remedy that treats both deficiency and excess conditions and brings balance, nourishment and detoxification. If more people ate dandelions instead of pouring poison on them the world would be a healthier place.

Dandelions

Every part of dandelion is edible and used medicinally.

The root roasted and ground makes a good caffeine-free coffee substitute drink and still maintains many properties after roasting, grinding and decocting. The root is also decocted or tinctured fresh or dried.

The young leaves eaten raw in salads, as steamed greens or mixed in a stir-fry. 1 cup of raw dandelion leaves is more nutritious than 1 cup of broccoli.

The flowers are high in nutritive antioxidants and are edible raw in salads or cooked as fritters and made into wine, tea or tincture.

The stem has milky white latex inside that removes warts when applied frequently topically.

Dandelion root: picked in the fall or spring from second year or older plants when the larger leaves have died back in November or in early spring when the leaves are small in March or April.

The leaves are an option to add with the root tincture or make it separately. Both the leaves and root work on the kidneys and liver but the small difference is that the leaves have more action on the kidneys because of the higher potassium content and the root has more action on the liver.

Common Name  Dandelion
Latin Name  Taraxacum officinale
Family Asteraceae (Aster Family)
Parts Used Perennial/ the second year, older root picked in fall or early spring root, leaves, flowers 
Target Organs digestion, intestines, stomach,  urinary, kidneys, liver/gallbladder, spleen, pancreas, kidneys, blood, fluids, skin
Common Uses Antioxidant Nutritive culinary medicine

Digestion: bitter digestive tonic, laxative, inflammation, hemorrhoids

Urinary: tonic, urinary infections, gout, arthritis,  muscular rheumatism, edema,

Liver: tonic,  congestion, cirrhosis, gallstones,  inflammation, jaundice,

high cholesterol, high blood fats

chronic skin conditions, acne, eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis,  

obesity, fatigue, metabolic disorders

Properties Antibacterial, antifungal, antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory, antilithic, antineoplastic, antioxidant, antirheumatic, antiulcerogenic, antiviral,  aperient, appetite stimulant, astringent, bitter, cholagogue, choleretic, depurative, diaphoretic, diuretic, emetic in large doses, secretolytic expectorant, febrifuge, galactagogue, hypocholesterolemic, hypolipidemic, immune stimulant, lymphatic, nervine, pancreatic, relaxant, sialagogue, spleenic, stomachic, tranquilizer, vasodilator, vulnerary 
Constituents Bitter glycosides, triterpenoids, bitter resin, gum, phytosterols, fatty acids, tannins, essential oil, inulin, levulin, saponin, enzyme, citric acid,

Minerals: potassium, calcium, sodium, phosphorus, iron.

Vitamins A,C, carotenoids, choline, niacin, (mannitol in spring root)

Cautions Avoid during pregnancy and with diuretic, liver medications 
Dosage Fresh or Dried Tincture: 2-5ml                Decoction 6-16g
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