Posts tagged ‘Infection’

April 23, 2013

Boneset Herb

2. White Boneset, july 27 03

Boneset is a native to the Ontario region, but is less common in the northern part of the province in Canada. Boneset grows together with the two species of gravel root or joe-pye, but Joe-pye grows in the south-western corner of the province. Both plants grow in wetlands, riverbanks, marshes and lakes, and prefer open sunny areas. Joe-pye root and boneset herb are both wetland plants that boost the immune system.

2. White Boneset, July 27 2003Boneset is easy to identify because of the joined leaves around the stem that grow in paired opposites. In this picture of white boneset, the white flowers are just about to bloom, and it is the best time to pick it.

It is best known for treating fevers and in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it treats all three stages of fever, Tai Yang, Shao Yang, Yang Ming. It is called boneset not because it knits and repairs bones like comfrey, but because it is used for deep, aching bone pain, like rheumatic typhoid and “bone breaking fever.” It is extremely bitter, cooling and drying while stimulating the liver and digestion. Caution is advised! This plant is becoming increasingly endangered due to destruction of wetland habitat and over harvesting.

Common Name  Boneset herb
Latin Name  Eupatorium perfoliatum
Family Asteraceae (Aster)
Parts Used Perennial- leaves and flowers
Target Organs immune, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, liver, stomach, throat
Common Uses Immune respiratory: stimulates immunity against infections. Used for fevers, dengue, malaria, colds, coughs, flu, infections, catarrh, sore throat, toxicity, Digestion: liver congestion, constipation, upset stomach, indigestion, gas, bloating Nervous system: debility, pain, neuralgia,
Properties Anticatarrhal, anti-inflammatory(local, systemic) anti-infective, antimicrobial, antineoplastic, antirheumatic, aperient, appetite stimulant, astringent, bitter,  cholagogue, choleretic, digestive stimulant, diaphoretic, diuretic, immune stimulant, febrifuge, nervine, relaxant, stomachic, tranquilizer, peripheral vasodilator, vulnerary
Constituents polysaccharides, flavonoids: quercetin, rutin, astragalin, hyperoside, inulin, sterols, vitamin D1, galic acid, essential volatile oil, glucosidal tannin, tannic acid, diterpenes, bitter glycoside: eupatorin, sesquiterpenes lactones, fatty resin,
Cautions Medium strength: Only use dried herb. Avoid high doses long term use. May cause diarrhoea, vomiting in high doses. Low doses short term use for acute infections. Should not be used by pregnant, nursing women, infants and children under the age of ten. Use in formulation up to 25% for no more than 1 week or two. 
Dosage Tincture: 1-3ml                Dried herb Tea infusion: 3-8g cold infusion for exhaustion and acute fever
December 27, 2012

DIY Myrrh Tincture

myrrhMyrrh resin is an age-old remedy from the Middle East with a long history. It was one of the gifts given by the wise men to baby Jesus along with golden frankincense resin. It is so healing it gets rid of any kind of infection, wounds, ulcers, pain and inflammation internally or externally. 

The Greek physician, Claudios Galenos, known as Galen for short, used myrrh to heal the wounds of gladiators in ancient Greco-Rome.

Myrrh is like camphor and tea tree essential oil in that it has amazing antiseptic action of being antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial. Used world-wide to heal wounds internally and externally myrrh gets rid of infection and excess mucous in the digestive and respiratory tracts, eases pain, inflammation and spasms.

Use Myrrh tincture internally and externally in compresses. The tincture turns a milky golden colour. The resin sticks to the bottom of the jar so stir it with a chopstick if this happens, and shake the tincture everyday. The resin may dissolve.

myrrh tincture

Soothing myrrh gargles, mouthwashes, douches relieve pain and infections internally. Use swabs, liniments and compresses  for external injuries and wounds.

Myrrh essential oil is for external use only! Never take essential oil resins internally.

Learn how to make your own tinctures.

DIY herbal tincture blog: https://earthelixir.ca/2012/01/10/make-your-own-herbal-tinctures/

Common Name Myrrh resin
Latin Name  Commiphora myrrha
Family Burseraceae (Torchwood family)
Parts Used Tree resin and essential oil
Target Organs Lungs, intestine, uterus, urinary organs, arterial circulation, skin
Common Uses Infections: viral, bacterial, fungal infections (especially of mouth, gums, throat, vagina)chronic inflammation, mouth ulcers, internal and external pain, swelling, sore throat, loss of voice, Skin: infections, wounds, ulcers, any tissue trauma

Female reproductive: balancing female cycles, painful difficult labour, retained placenta,

Lungs: cold lung phlegm, productive cough, chronic bronchitis, wheezing, fatigue, chills

Intestines: microbial dysbiosis, candida, parasites, chronic gastritis, indigestion, volcano belly, mucous damp pain, congestion

Properties analgesic, antiseptic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antineoplastic, antiulcerogenic, antithrombotic, antispasmodic, antirheumatic, bitter, carminative, diaphoretic, immune stimulant, lymphatic, nervine, stomachic, vasodilator, antidiarrheal, astringent, decongestant, stimulant, hemostatic, vulnerary, oxytocic parturient, stimulating secretolytic expectorant, systemic (internally) warming, locally (externally) cooling,
Constituents Essential oil 2.5-10%(hydrocarbon methylisopropenyl furane 4%, sesquiterpenes-(elemene, copaene, curzerene), methyllisobutyl ketone, aldehyde, resin 25-40% (commiphoric acid, commiphorinic acid, heerabomyrrhol), gums 50-60%, salts, sulphates, oxydase, xylose, galactose
Cautions Do not use during pregnancy it is a uterine stimulant
Dosage Tincture 2-3 ml
July 26, 2012

Echinacea with Amazing Butterfly Pictures

Echinacea is blooming and what a beautiful butterfly magnet it is! Echinacea is the latin name that people are familiar with, but the common name for this amazing perennial wildflower is purple coneflower. ‘Echinos’ is the Greek word for sea urchin or hedgehog, which relates to the look of the center cones that resemble the spines of hedgehogs, especially when dried.

There are three types or species of Echinacea:

  1. ‘purpurea’ is the purple variety
  2. ‘angustifolia’ is the narrow leaf variety
  3. ‘pallida’ means pale, named for the paler varieties. This variety is used less  medicinally.

Do not misuse Echinacea as a long-term immune enhancer, it is not like adaptogens such as ginseng. Echinacea is a cool detoxicant that reduces infection and heat. Use it for short-term infections and acute conditions only.

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***Echinacea should only be used as short-term immune stimulant. Do not use long-term and avoid overuse. Do not pick it in the wild, it is extinct and endangered. Cultivate it yourself or buy the root dried. Echinacea is also a good ingredient in gargles, washes, compresses, syrups, and used externally to treat injuries, burns, and skin disorders.

Common Name  Echinacea/ Purple coneflower root
Latin Name  Echinacea spp. angustifolia/ purpurea/pallida
Family Asteraceae
Parts Used perennial flowers rarely used/ root harvested in late summer /fall after blooming
Target Organs Blood, lymphatic, skin, stomach, urogenital, immune,
Common Uses bacterial viral infections, first sign cold, flu, chills, swollen glands lymph congestion, runny stuffy nose, cough, laryngitis, food allergies, UTI, skin infections, fever, inflammation, discharge,  wounds, ulcers, burns,
Properties Cool, dry, calming, stimulating, restoring, dissolving, anti-microbial, antibacterial, antiallergenic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, anti-toxic, astringent, alterative, anti-catarrhal, antiviral, antineoplastic, febrifuge, depurative, detoxicant, diuretic, lymphatic, decongestant, stimulating/regulating, immune stimulant, vulnerary
Constituents Essential oil, humulene, sesquiterpenes, glycoside echinoside, polysaccharides-echinacin, inulin, isobutylamides, polyines, polyenes, echinolone, betaine, tannins, resins, oleic/cerotic/ linolic/ palmatic acids, 13 polyacetylenes, enzymes, fatty acids, phytosterols, trace minerals, vitamin C
Cautions Mild remedy but may cause dizziness, nausea, numb tongue, gastric upset, cankers, throat irritation due to its stimulating nature.
Dosage Most effective: Tincture: 2-4ml                 Decoction: 6-10 g

Acute conditions like infection or onset of a cold

Take up to 2 tablespoons of decoction or 1 tsp. of tincture every two hours at acute protocols

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